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This home presumably was Jacob Neely’s living quarters in his last days, a home that would have overlooked the river in downtown Cape Girardeau near the Mississippi River bridge.

Local sources say Jacob Neely started a boat landing on the river as early as 1815, and his wife Sara Walls operated a tavern, possibly serving raftsmen as they came down the river with their wares.

Passengers would be seen loitering and chatting on the cabin deck in front of the cabin.

[Some had just finished dinner.] However, stored on the forward lower deck was a lot of hay and other easily flammable freight and it is supposed that some deck passenger in smoking dropped some fire in the great pile of freight which was not discovered until it had gained considerable headway.

And Jacob Neely’s third marriage was to Margaret M.

Hope on June 5, 1849, performed by an “ordained minister of the Gospel.” Aside from the above records and a search through Cape Girardeau County newspapers for Jacob Neely’s name—the newspapers yielding nothing more than a note that Neely had mail to pick up at the Jackson, Missouri, post office in 1821—the only thing remaining to sift through were Neely’s probate records at the Missouri State Archives.

According to the, Neely’s Landing had 20 residents in 1876. After the Frisco Railroad went through the town in 1904, the town’s population doubled because of the need for depot workers, section crewmen, and night watchmen. Hines said that when she was postmaster in the 1940s, Neely’s post office route included 21 miles and more than 500 patrons.

Neely’s Landing takes its name from a family that for a time lived on the river’s bank, the family of Jacob Hays Neely.

On October 29, 1869, the , and the fact that only a small portion of the passengers and crew had been saved, caused great consternation and cast a gloom over the faces of all.

On December 17, 1863, a petition came before the Cape County Court for the sale of real estate belonging to Jacob H. The records never state specifically on what day Neely passed away, but they do tell us that on May 16, 1864, John and Sebastian Albert purchased Lot No.

18 in Range H in the city of Cape Girardeau and the “comfortable dwelling house therein” for

On October 29, 1869, the , and the fact that only a small portion of the passengers and crew had been saved, caused great consternation and cast a gloom over the faces of all.

On December 17, 1863, a petition came before the Cape County Court for the sale of real estate belonging to Jacob H. The records never state specifically on what day Neely passed away, but they do tell us that on May 16, 1864, John and Sebastian Albert purchased Lot No.

18 in Range H in the city of Cape Girardeau and the “comfortable dwelling house therein” for $1,281.

In October 1869, this small river landing became the focus of headlines when the steamboat , Mark Twain wrote about the “Graveyard” of steamboats and about the Devil’s Tea Table.

Twain described the Devil’s Tea Table as “a great smooth-surfaced mass of rock, with diminishing wine-glass stem, perched some fifty or sixty feet above the river.” Only a few photographs of the Devil’s Tea Table still exist.

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On October 29, 1869, the , and the fact that only a small portion of the passengers and crew had been saved, caused great consternation and cast a gloom over the faces of all.On December 17, 1863, a petition came before the Cape County Court for the sale of real estate belonging to Jacob H. The records never state specifically on what day Neely passed away, but they do tell us that on May 16, 1864, John and Sebastian Albert purchased Lot No.18 in Range H in the city of Cape Girardeau and the “comfortable dwelling house therein” for $1,281.In October 1869, this small river landing became the focus of headlines when the steamboat , Mark Twain wrote about the “Graveyard” of steamboats and about the Devil’s Tea Table.Twain described the Devil’s Tea Table as “a great smooth-surfaced mass of rock, with diminishing wine-glass stem, perched some fifty or sixty feet above the river.” Only a few photographs of the Devil’s Tea Table still exist.

,281.

In October 1869, this small river landing became the focus of headlines when the steamboat , Mark Twain wrote about the “Graveyard” of steamboats and about the Devil’s Tea Table.

Twain described the Devil’s Tea Table as “a great smooth-surfaced mass of rock, with diminishing wine-glass stem, perched some fifty or sixty feet above the river.” Only a few photographs of the Devil’s Tea Table still exist.

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Steamboat companies often had pocket books that listed the landings on their routes and the mile markers of each.

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